Ex-Aggies apply for work in NFL

Keelan Doss (left) went from the disappointment of not being selected in the NFL Draft to signing with the Oakland Raiders. The wide receiver, who played for Raiders coach Jon Gruden in the Senior Bowl, is not the only former UC Davis player to have an opportunity to earn a job in the NFL. Linebacker Mason Moe (right) and defensive back Vincent White (above) have been invited to rookie mini-camps by the Philadelphia Eagles and Denver Broncos, respectively.

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When NFL calls, Doss will answer

“Are you my son?”

Tammie Chambless asks that question when she looks at her only child and wonders if he might just be too good to be true. Keelan Doss has accomplished quite a bit in 22 years. He graduated from UC Davis in December with a degree in sociology after becoming one of the top wide receivers in college football.

If Chambless thinks Doss is a bit annoyed by her posting and boasting on Facebook, imagine what will happen her son’s name is called Saturday when the NFL Draft enters rounds 4-7. Doss emerged in 2016 by catching 66 passes for 911 yards and 10 touchdowns. As a junior in 2017, he had 115 receptions for 1,499 yards and seven touchdowns on his way to being named the the Offensive Player of the Year in the Big Sky Conference.

Doss could have skipped his senior season at UC Davis and entered the draft last year, but he had a feeling that 2018 would be special. The Aggies won seven of 26 games in Doss’ first three years (he redshirted in 2015), then went 5-6 in 2017 after Dan Hawkins returned to his alma mater as coach.

Doss could have skipped his senior season at UC Davis and entered the draft last year, but he had a feeling that 2018 would be special. The Aggies won seven of 26 games in Doss’ first three years (he redshirted in 2015), then went 5-6 in 2017 after Dan Hawkins returned to his alma mater as coach.

As Hawkins restored pride in the program, the decision by Doss to stay put inspired his teammates to sacrifice as much as he did by opting to return instead of pursuing fame and fortune in the NFL.

If Doss had “unfinished business,” as Hawkins said, the Aggies repaid Doss for in his investment of faith by going 10-3, earning a share of the Big Sky championship and reaching the FCS playoffs for the first time.

 If Doss had “unfinished business,” as Hawkins said, the Aggies repaid Doss for in his investment of faith by going 10-3, earning a share of the Big Sky championship and reaching the FCS playoffs for the first time.

Chambless loves to brag about her son on Facebook, but she refuses to accept any credit for all he has accomplished. “This is his story. This is his doing. This is his path,”  she said. “I’m his biggest fan. He’s not one for attention. He’s always telling me, ‘Mom, you don’t have to tag me in everything on Facebook.’”

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“Is that your grandson?”

Bob Matteson expects to hear that question when he sits in his favorite Lodi donut shop and proudly points out the framed photo of Doss on the wall. Chambless’ father realizes how difficult it will be for most folks to come to grips with the notion that an 83-year-old white man is claiming to have a black grandson.

“It’s always been perfectly natural for us,” Matteson exclaimed in reference to anyone who might think otherwise.

Doss visited his grandfather at the donut shop in November and autographed the photo. According to Chambless, Doss sent her a text after four hours to let her know he was still in Lodi. Mattson begs to differ with the time element, saying Doss stayed no longer than 90 minutes. Doss says it was more like 2 hours.

“(Doss) made his grandpa’s day,” Chambless said.

What really mattered to Matteson is that Doss took the time in the heart of football season to visit his grandfather. Chambless and Doss’ father, Keith Doss, never married, so Chambless and her son lived with her parents when Doss was a toddler. In raising her son, Chambless counted on her parents to lend a hand.

Even after Chambless and Doss moved to Alameda, her parents continued to provide guidance for their grandson. “They believed in him when he was finding his way,” Chambless recalled. “That’s all he needed.”

Doss has paid tribute to his grandparents with tattoos on his left arm. He got his first after turning 18,  much to his mother’s chagrin until she learned the tattoo would be of her father’s favorite Bible verse – John 3:16.

The second tattoo is a portrait of his grandmother, Julie Matteson, who died in 2016. Chambless has the same one.

“She will live forever with me,” Doss said of his grandmother. “She was a great person. She treated everyone equally.”

Julie Matteson did not see saw her grandson as black. Doss has never thought of his grandparents as white. Chambless is as proud of her son for embracing his mixed ethnicity as she is of his ability to catch a football.

“I’ve never put two and two together. I don’t think about it like that,” Doss said. “It’s a weird dynamic, but I’ve never been bothered by it. I can be both black and white. That’s great for me. Everybody’s the same anyway.” 

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